Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Some More Quincy Scenery

Here are a few more shots of Quincy, my beloved little town. I took them last August, actually, when the gardens around the various old mansions and other buildings were still lush and green. I'm not sure why I finally decided to write about them today. I guess summer pictures just have extra appeal at the cold, dreary end of February.

R.K Shaw-Embry House


R.K. Shaw-Embry House

This massive Queen Anne-style house stands just up the street from Spruce Pine Cottage. It was built in 1895 by Robert K. Shaw, a shade-tobacco planter and insurance agent. (Shade tobacco used to be Quincy’s big industry.) The house looks like Cinderella’s castle, too enormous to miss. It’s a colossal assemblage of towers and balconies, deep porches and gables. Chimneys and leaded glass windows abound. The entire property is ringed by an elaborate red brick wall with wrought-iron gates. Roses lie on the wall, and hollies peek out from behind it. I’ve heard lots of rumors about the house, about what it’s like inside (I’ve never been in it). Somebody told me once, for example, that the former owners used to use the sprawling attic as a roller skating rink.

Thomas Monroe-Higdon House

Thomas Munroe-Higdon House


This house is the centerpiece of King Street, which is itself the centerpiece of Quincy’s charming historic district. The grounds take up half a block. With its white columns and symmetrical design, the house, built in 1849, is classic Greek Revival. The present owners, the Higdons, keep it in immaculate condition. The paint is always perfect snowy white, and the front walk is never marred by a leaf. The surrounding gardens are lush with cabbage palms, camellias, banana shrubs, hydrangeas, dogwoods, magnolias, and live oaks. Fountains trickle, and lounge chairs lie in the shade of a white wooden pavilion in the side yard.

Gadsden County Courthouse


Gadsden County Courthouse

The lovely Beaux-Arts courthouse in the center of town is a testimony to Quincy's old days of prosperity. It was designed, in 1912, by none other than Hal Hentz of Hentz and Reid, the most prestigious architecture firm in Atlanta at that time. (The firm designed dozens of Atlanta landmarks, including the famous Swan House and Rich’s flagship store downtown.)

The courthouse square is shaded by huge magnolias and live oaks and is often the scene of fun events, like barbecues and concerts. Gadsden is a small county, so I get called for jury duty quite frequently. I'm not that fond of jury duty, but I do like being inside the courthouse. I don't even need to bring a book to read during the lulls in jury selection; I just sit there and admire the crown molding.

Padgett's Jewelry Store

Padgett’s Jewelry Store

This building is located in downtown Quincy, just across the street from the courthouse. Built in 1894, it housed a general store until it was purchased by Padgett’s Jewelers in 1979. I love driving into town after work each evening and seeing the huge Coca-Cola mural on the building’s side, and I love stopping at Padgett’s, especially when I’m gift shopping and I've given myself permission to actually buy something. In addition to jewelry, Padgett’s sells china and silver and all manner of knickknacks. It’s a thriving operation, pretty much the only one in our largely abandoned (but adorable) downtown. Yet I do think things are looking up in Quincy. I really do. An oyster place called Flookah’s recently opened, and so did a sports bar (L.R.'s).

Well, I wish I had more pictures to share, but these were the only four that turned out. (Pictures are the hardest part of blogging for me.) Oh, and if you're wondering where I got all the names and dates in this post, they came from  “On the Trail in Historic Quincy,” a really cool walking-tour guide put together by the Gadsden Arts Center.


13 comments:

  1. My mind is stuck at the roller skating rink. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I know, Eli. Isn't that weird? Last night I asked Rob, "Did we really hear that they would roller skate in the attic?" And he said, "Oh, yeah. You didn't make that up." He reminded me that we heard it from more than one person, actually :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I enjoy your writing, Leslie. Quincy seems like a fun place to live. --Maria

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Leslie! Thanks for coming by my blog. I've been going through a few of your posts and really enjoyed them. Love your photography! And, your cottage!! Right up my alley of favorite houses. I used to live in SW Florida before moving to the caribbean. I will be back to visit your blog! It's a keeper.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Quincy looks like a darling place! --Terry

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love the Quincy houses....my husbands best friends parents lived there. and of course my parents in Coon Bottom...I adore old Victorians like the first one...I have a new one only its 2 story!..always wanted to remodel one...no way!Tallahassee is so pretty in spring with all the azaleas and dogwoods..I hope you take lots of pics

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a charming town. It looks like just the place I'd like to visit. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks, Maria! It is a great place to live!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks, Jean! I just love your blog. I'm so glad I found it!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Terry, thanks so much for visiting!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thanks, Sharon! I do love this area in spring. The dogwoods are just starting to bloom now. I'm so excited!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Daisy, thanks! Hope you have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Could not take my eyes off that Queen Anne house!!!
    Love it. I can see you going back for more photos... please... could you?
    Lol.

    Blessings for a wonderful weekend.
    Dotti xx

    ReplyDelete